Wrist Lanyards


wrist tool lanyards

Wrist Tool Lanyard (D Ring)
Velcro Fastening
wrist tool lanyards

Wrist Tool Lanyard (D Ring)
Buckle Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Loop) Velcro Fastening

Wrist Tool Lanyard (Loop)
Velcro Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Loop) Buckle Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Loop)
Buckle Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel) Velcro Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel)
Velcro Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel) Buckle Fastening
Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel)
Buckle Fastening

Wrist Tool Lanyard (D Ring &Elastic) Velcro FasteningWrist Tool Lanyard
(D Ring & Elastic)
Velcro Fastening


Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel & Elastic) Velcro Fastening

Wrist Tool Lanyard
(D Ring & Elastic)
Buckle Fastening



Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel) Velcro Fastening

Wrist Tool Lanyard
(Swivel & Elastic)
Velcro Fastening

Wrist Tool Lanyard (Swivel & Elastic) Buckle Fastening

Wrist Tool Lanyard
(Swivel & Elastic)
Buckle Fastening





The Convenience of Wrist Tool Lanyards

Workers all over the world are familiar with the phrase "working smarter, not harder." When it comes to at height work in the UK and elsewhere, that phrase takes on added importance because safety is just as important as accomplishing the task. Employees who work in at height situations need to always think safety first as though it were the most important goal of the workday. And to do that "smarter" means choosing the appropriate safety equipment.

For example, at height workers secure their tools from falling by attaching them with lanyards to tool belts, safety harnesses, or scaffolding. The choice of lanyard is as important to job efficiency as it is to safety. To work "smarter, not harder" in relation to securing hand tools, the worker must choose a lanyard which allows him to do his job as efficiently as possible without compromising the safety of the system. One of the most efficient lanyards available for some types of tools is the wrist tool lanyard.

The wrist tool lanyard attaches around the wrist with a Velcro strap or a belt buckle fastener. A single tool attaches to the lanyard with a steel clip. This type of lanyard is very efficient for short-term tasks where a worker might be using a small hand tool throughout the duration of the task with small interruptions when his hands need to be free. This type of lanyard allows the hand tool to be easily accessible with a simple flick of the wrist.

Who Benefits from Wrist Tool Lanyards

The types of workers most normally associated with wrist tool lanyards are those who do short-term tasks in quick bursts. For example, a carpenter or scaffolder might be working at height with a limited set of hand tools. To complete his task he may need just a cordless drill, a screwdriver, and a tape measure. With the drill holstered on one hip and a tape measure on the other, the worker could attach a screwdriver using a wrist lanyard. By doing so he eliminates the need for a third holster or tool bag, while also keeping the screwdriver secure and ready to use. And because his task is a short one, he is able to unhook a screwdriver and holster at while he's on the ground moving to
the next location.

Other types of workers to benefit from wrist to lanyards include line men, steel erectors, construction, utility, offshore, telecommunication and process engineers to name but a few. For the individual worker however, the idea is to find the specific types of lanyards that are most efficient. The worker who succeeds will find himself getting so used to working with them that he won't even notice them after a while.

Wrist Tool Lanyard Fasteners

There are several different types of wrist lanyard designs especially when it comes to the fastening system. Perhaps the most common method is to use a heavy-duty Velcro strip. If the manufacturer uses a commercial-grade heavy-duty Velcro it should withstand the test of time and remain durable for many years of faithful use. However, workers should always check the integrity of the Velcro strip before every use.

The second type of connection for a wrist tool lanyard is a buckling system. This system works very similar to a lap belt, incorporating a classic interlocking clasp system. This system is extremely safe and is easier and quicker to fit once adjusted. However, it can be a little bit uncomfortable for those with skin sensitivities. Just like with the Velcro faster, always check the integrity of the buckle system before using a lanyard.

Warning! Wrist lanyards have an inherent danger in as much as should they get caught up and entangled, for example in plant or rotating machinery, the wrist lanyard can create a danger to the wearer if they cannot
be quickly released.

For this reason it's imperative that the wrist attachment is able to be instantly released to prevent de-gloving (where the skin is removed from the hand) or even worse where the wearer is dragged into the machinery. For this reason the wrist lanyard should be fitted with an expansion joint, which allows it to be automatically released from the user if it becomes tangeled up and a danger. This being said the lanyard must still retain it's integrity if a tool is
dropped while attached.

Styles Wrist Tool Lanyards

Beyond the fastening systems, wrist tool lanyards also come in various designs. For example, you may have a lanyard which utilizes a Velcro wrist strap and a wire line. This is very common and one of the best ways to secure hand tools safely. It cannot be adjusted, neither is it flexible.

You can buy elasticized wrist lanyards for increased flexibility, or ones that swivel at the joint to allow tool rotation for different tool combinations. Finally, there's the spiralled wrist lanyard which provides safety and flexibility without the worries of entangling.

Think Safety First

The whole idea behind securing tools at height is the idea of safety first. But safety is not necessarily accomplished if we use tool lanyards not appropriate for our specific applications. For example, it would be unwise to use a heavy cordless drill with a wrist lanyard anything more than a quick job. Trying to use it for an entire day is not appropriate because of the size and weight of the tool. In this case a better selection would be a wire lanyard attached to a belt.

By the same token, when using a screwdriver in short but frequent bursts it is completely impractical and unnecessary to use a heavy-gauge elastic lanyard attached to a harness. The wrist tool lanyard is perfectly safe for this application and is in most cases more efficient. When choosing your lanyards you may need a selection of different styles so that you can easily adapt to the conditions of any particular job.

Tool Safety Catalogue
Tool Safety Roadmap
Tool Safety Roadmap